brain gut axis in concussion and tbi

One of the most commonly overlooked side effects or symptoms of TBI and Concussion is the disruption of the Brain-Gut Axis. There are several connections from the brain to the gut, two of the better known connections are the Vagus Nerve, and the Nucelus Tractus Solitarius. Both of these are found in the lower brain stem and contribute to not only gut function, but eye control, autonomic stability (heart rate and blood pressure control) and overall health.

We typically see patients after they have seen 3 or 4 practitioners and are in the chronic state. In our office we perform an extensive neurological examination including neuro-diagnostics and functional medicine evaluation to help us identify these areas of dysfunction which help uncover areas that may have been overlooked by previous physicians. Once we identify the neurological and physiological domains that are -under or -over firing we review a game-plan and expectations with the patient.

One you have all the information about your condition, it is up to you if you would like to move forward rehabilitating the brain regions identified as faulty.

For an appointment please call (480) 756-2600

 

 

“Traumatic Brain Injury and the Effect on the Brain-Gut Axis.
Kharrazian D.
Abstract
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of disability worldwide. One commonly overlooked effect of TBI is the disruption of the brain-gut axis, leading to gastrointestinal dysfunction. The brain-gut axis consists of the cortical areas of the insular cortex, cingulate, and hypothalamus that have bidirectional communication with the visceral enteric nervous system through afferent and efferent projections into the pontine vagal complex and nucleus tractus solitarius. Communication with the brain also occurs through messenger signals from the gut’s microbiota, involving gut peptides, cytokines, and lipopolysaccharides. Disruption of the brain-gut axis from TBI can lead to a chronic, inflammatory, vicious sequela, involving both the brain and the gastrointestinal system, with both neuroregulatory and neuroimmunological loops.” —    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26348611